Police arrest a Stevensville woman for shoplifting.  Deputies were called to the Rite Aid store in Chester where an employee of the store told police that a woman was stealing. Deputies made contact with the woman, Robin Wessel. While speaking with Wessel, deputies learned that Wessel hid the merchandise on her person, in her vehicle, and at her residence. Wessel was placed under arrest for theft and the merchandise was returned to the store.

 

Police are also investigating a theft from 300 Block of William Way in Stevensville. The victim reported that someone broke into his car and stole his wallet and power tools. If you have any information in reference to this incident, please contact the QAC Sheriff’s Office.

 

State accreditation has been given to The Maryland Department of Juvenile Services’ J. DeWeese Carter Center in Chestertown. The Carter Center is one of about 500 facilities across the country to receive national accreditation.  The center is a secure facility for at risk girls in the state.

 

University of Maryland scientists predicted a 2 cubic mile large dead zone, an area with no oxygen would form in the waters of the Chesapeake Bay and in late July, Maryland's Department of Natural Resources confirmed it found that 2-mile dead zone a lot worse than what they've found in years past. Queen Anne's County waterman Dennis Anthony tells WBOC 16 it takes days to catch just a bushel of crabs and nearly half a day to find crabs to catch.  Dave Nemazie  a coastal scientist at the University of Maryland of Environmental Science says he's hopeful improvements to stopping pollution and wastewater will continue to help the bay.

 

Police are looking into damages done to a 2004 Bluebird school bus.  Officers say the bus was parked at warehouse property on 4-H Park Road in Queenstown.  Officers determined that brake fluid had been drained from the vehicle due to a damaged brake line.

 

The MDOT has launched a public-private partnership between the state and company of a new breath alcohol detection system. The new Driver Alcohol Detection System for Safety measures the level of alcohol on a driver’s breath. Officials say small sensors inside vehicle panels analyze breath molecules using infrared light. If the driver’s breath alcohol level is above a certain range, the car won’t start. Testing will now begin on the new system.